New Willandra Pants from Muna and Broad

Milk Plum Willandra

The Willandra Pants are the newest pattern that Leila and I have released as Muna and Broad! These pants are our ‘fancy work pants’ and call for fabric with lots of drape.

Apologies for the over- edited photos, but I tried to lighten the pictures up so you could see my side-seams as the diagonal side seam which wraps around the body is kind of the highlight here (in addition to the extra-fancy look).

Milk Plum Willandra

I made these pants in Maroon colours MeetMILK sanded wash tencel which I purchased from Studio of Sewing in Auckland, New Zealand. The fabric, as the name suggests, has a lovely sandwashed look and the texture is really dreamy to wear.

The tencel wasn’t slippery to sew with and it didn’t fray or stretch over my hems. That’s great news because the diagonal seam means the edge of the pants is mostly on the bias, and over-handling could lead to a lot of stretching out.

Milk Plum Willandra

Size details:

I have a 56″ hip and I make a Size 1 in the Muna and Broad pants patterns (conveniently our sample size. These pants are definitely the most fitted of any of our pants, and I also made sure the elastic was super tight back there, as there’s nothing worse than gapey pants.

I love that these pants have the same excellent fit for me, straight out of the packet. I didn’t make any changes to the pattern other than adding bias tape around the edges of my pocket bags for some extra fanciness.

Milk Plum Willandra

Fabric Usage:

I was able to squeeze my Size 1 pants out of 2 metres of fabric by the pattern pieces out with the fabric on the flat (not folding the fabric over to cut out two mirrored pieces at once. You could potentially achieve the same results by folding the fabric in the opposite direction to usual- one of the leg pieces is much wider than the other, and depending on your size, I think it would be a struggle to fit those across the width of the fabric

Boxy Barkcloth Torrens Box Dress

Torrens Box Dress

There’s a very popular dress and jacket pattern that’s not available for fat-makers and I decided today on a whim that I’d like to make something very similar for myself, but using a pattern that is available in my size. So here’s part 2 of my Torrens Box Dress exploration, using the Muna and Broad Torrens Box Top pattern.

Torrens Box Dress

I’ve been saving this lovely Outback Wife Barkcloth fabric from Fibresmith in Australia for a special project, and since Outback Wife fabric isn’t made anymore, it was more important than ever that I made something that I knew would fit well! I make a Size 1 in Muna and Broad sizes for my 47″ bust and 56″ hip.

Torrens Box Dress

I had 3 metres of this fabric, which was enough to cut a suitably long dress from, the narrow-sleeve long sleeve and also the facings. I doubt I would have had enough of the fabric to cut the in-seam pockets from, but since I wanted to use something a bit lighter and less structured for the pockets, that was fine.

Torrens Box Dress

I added side-seam pockets shortly below the armpit, and lengthened the top pattern in a straight line down after the pattern piece ended using my blue silk noil torrens as a guide for length. I also cut out a self-fabric tie, which I was intending to interface but didn’t need to since the barkcloth was quite firm.

The outcome? I love this dress and can definitely see myself wearing this to work (when we go back to work)! I’m already mentally sifting through my stash to see what other fabrics might make dresses suitable for pairing with tights for winter!

The perfect merino turtleneck pattern throwdown

I’ve decided to take advantage of this long-weekend to find the perfect pattern to use for my treasured marsala merino, which I’d like to make the winter-layering-turtleneck-of-my-dreams from!

Since we’re in lockdown here in NZ and it’s not possible to print any new patterns out, this throwdown has been limited to patterns that I already have printed. Spoiler Alert: after making them, I’m still not sure which one should be the winner (or if I should keep looking), so I’d love to hear your opinions.

The contenders are:

The Cashmerette Pembroke Dress & Tunic
Available up to a 58″ bust and 58″ hip and coming with choose-your-cup-size options.

The free Grainline Studio Hemlock Tee
Available up to a 56″ bust and 59″ hip in the plus-size pattern which runs from size 14-30

The Paper Theory LB Pullover
Available up to a 56″ bust and 57.5″ hip

My Details:
Bust: 47 inches
Waist: 44 inches
Hips: 56 inches Continue reading “The perfect merino turtleneck pattern throwdown”

Adrianna Dress Toile, Friday Pattern

I’ve used my ‘sewing in isolation’ time to work through the backlog of printed-but-unmade PDF patterns in my stash, which includes toiling this Adrianna Dress pattern from Friday Pattern Co in some rayon fabric that I bought on super sale, and which I now consider to be extremely ugly (but I can’t remember if I thought that at the time of purchase, or if I thought it would be handy for toiles)…

Adrianna Dress

The Adrianna Dress pattern (which is available up to 54″ bust and 57″ hip) is the woven dress companion pattern to the Adrienne Blouse (which is for knits, is a top and isn’t available in the extended size range).

Friday Pattern Company patterns are drafted for a B-cup and on reading the reviews from Sierra and Michelle over on the CSC I decided that I’d probably need to do baby’s first Full-Bust-Adjustment.

Adrianna Dress

Size Details: So I started with a 1X at the bust and graded out to the 4X from below the bust dart (I used the 1X sleeve pieces, since they seemed generous enough). I then used this tutorial on the Curvy Sewing Collective to do a FBA of 2 inches (so 1 inch on each side). This hideously patterned fabric might be hiding a multitude of sins on my FBA, but given how to top of the dress fits (quite snug), I definitely couldn’t have gone without it.

Adrianna Dress

I had to cut the sleeves shorter than called for due to a lack of fabric (the sleeves are so wide) and I didn’t bother putting elastic in the bottom since this dress isn’t likely to ever be seen outside of my apartment.


This was my first Friday Pattern Co pattern and I thought the instructions were great. I saw that the designer Chelsea studied fashion design and I think there’s absolutely a correlation between having training and being able to make consistent patterns which fit bodies, I’m looking forward to purchasing and making more Friday patterns!

Flynn Jacket, In The Folds

Flynn Jacket

The Flynn Jacket from In The Folds has a size range of 29 7⁄8″-51 5⁄8″ Bust, 33″-54 3⁄4″ Hip

I made a size “I”, which was going by my bust size. I was part of the original testing group for this jacket and I didn’t make any changes to the pattern apart from making the sleeves slightly shorter

Pattern Sizing:
The pattern is available in 10 sizes (A – J, which equates to Australian sizes 6-24)
In the folds sizes run from a 30-52″ (76-131cm) bust and 33-55″ (84-139cm) hip and they’re all drafted for a B cup and someone who is 5’7″ (170cm) tall

Although I’m technically sized out of the In The Folds size range by 1 inch, I didn’t make the largest available size of the jacket, and I think that I definitely didn’t need to ‘size-up’.

Flynn Jacket

I really like this pattern, although the pockets are a little low for me to reach in to comfortably, except when I’m sitting down! Because it would be a bit of a mission to change that, I’ll probably never change the pattern to do anything about that!

Probably my favourite part of this pattern is the box pleat at the back of the jacket, along with the style line (which is also where the facing sits), I think this makes the jacket look especially classy from the back.

The jacket calls for bottom-weight fabric, and I was at a bit of a loss so went with this denim, but I’d love a way to make the jacket in a more fancy-work-appropriate-fabric.
The sleeves were almost comically long on me, but that’s an easy enough fix for the next iteration of this jacket (which is definitely coming once I find the perfect fabric)!