Muna and Broad Capsule Wardrobe

I’ve been experimenting with testing out the mix-and-match possibilities of the current Muna and Broad pattern offerings.
A few years before I got in to sewing I tried to coordinate myself a black and white capsule wardrobe of nicer, work-appropriate clothes (I know now that neither black or white are great colours for me ). I definitely do still occasionally make a ‘wardrobe orphan’ from a fabric I love, or in a shape that I love, but which pairs with nothing else in my wardobe!

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Above, clockwise from top left are the Torrens Box Top, Waikerie Shirt (View B), Waikerie Dress (View B), Glebe Pants (View A), Willandra Pants, Mallee Jacket, Nullarbor Cami which I’ve combined to make a small capsule. This is something like what you could pack for a week away (when we get back to travel).

With these 7 pieces, I’ve mapped out below the 23 different combinations that are possible.

There’s all kinds of information out there on different ways to make capsule wardrobes, different rules to follow (4 tops, 4 bottoms, 4 layering pieces, etc), but for this I just picked some items that work for cooler weather, and that could be paired easily.

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Above, we have the subtle natural colour gingham Torrens Box Top and the mustard crepe Nullarbor Cami worn alone with the natural linen Glebe Pants (View A), and the plum tencel Willandra Pants. I also have the heavy-weight chambray Waikerie Dress (View B) worn as a dress instead of an outer layer.

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Above, the pink linen Waikerie Shirt is worn both as a shirt and as an outer-layer atop the other options. Choosing tops that can do double-duty really open up the possible outfits for the capsule. One permutation that didn’t occur to me until after I took the photos is this pink shirt layered under the Mallee Jacket and the Waikerie Dress, which adds an extra 4 possible outfits

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And here are the tops layered under the Mallee Jacket and Waikerie Dress.

This 7-piece collection was reverse engineered from existing pieces in my wardrobe which went together well- most of the concern is matching the textures and colours because all of my Muna and Broad makes do work together, just sometimes the colours look terrible together!

Mallee Jacket from Muna and Broad

The Mallee Jacket is the latest release from Leila and I through Muna and Broad. It’s designed specifically for boiled wool, but I used a viscose/wool blend boucle which doesn’t fray because it was tough to find boiled wool here in NZ back when I tested this pattern during our warmer months.

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Fabric Usage: The pattern pieces can be jigsawed in such a way that my size (Size F) can be made from 2.1metres of 150cm fabric. That’s especially good news because boiled wool, like all wool, can be pricey to buy.

I purchased this fabric locally back in February, and it’s no longer available. However, there are lots of great places in NZ and Australia to buy boiled wool from. I’ve included a list (with links) below, and anything in bold is a shop that I’ve shopped with myself in the past.

Drapers Fabric NZ and Australia
Miss Maude NZ
Ackroyd & Adams NZ
MaaiDesigns Australia
The Drapery Australia
Minervas Bower Australia
House of Cloth Australia
Fabric Deluxe Australia

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The actual design of the jacket has the pocket bags on the inside of the front, but I sewed mine on to the front as patch-pockets. There’s also an option to add buttons to the jacket (and it’s really easy to make button-holes on boiled wool since it doesn’t fray), but I chose to keep it simple and keep it as-is!

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I’ve been wearing this jacket a lot more than I thought I would- it conveniently goes with much of my wardrobe. I think I’ll make another version, but I haven’t found quite the right shade to inspire me (I’m not really crazy about a grey or black coat since it wouldn’t blend all that well with most of my me-mades), but I’m on the lookout!

Muna and Broad winter warmers

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I’ve been dreaming of a cosy winter ensemble, inspired by this top I spotted on Instagram combined with this dusky pink wool suiting blend which I scored 3m of for $15 last year! I also loved Leila’s pink pleated-front Glebe Pants (which she didn’t reach for and can now be seen on the ridiculous cool Lydia from @styleisstyle).

Having tested out the pleated front, flat waistband (View B) Glebe Pants in some black pinstripe wool suiting, I knew that I wanted at least a couple more pairs for the colder months. I love the fit on these, and I’ve got the construction down to a fine art. Because Leila included notches in the pattern to indicate the seam allowances, I can skip checking back on the instructions which certainly helps things go much quicker. I also skipped lining these pants, and I’m hoping I won’t need to go back to line the pants because of itchiness.

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The Top here is a hacked Torrens Box Top made from this open weave cotton blend from The Fabric Store. They do warn you about the very open weave on the fabric potentially leading to issues during sewing, so I felt warned but ultimately surprised by what a pain this shifty mess was! I’m not sure this hem will be my final, I’m considering adding on a thick bottom hem to really push those ‘oversized sweater’ vibes.

Because the cotton outer fabric was so shifty, I lined it in a white ‘linen’ fabric which I got from a second-hand store. I cut front and back top pieces from the linen, sewing it at the shoulder seams before sewing it around the neckline in lieu of a facing.

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Size details: I made a straight size A Torrens Box Top and Size 1 Glebe Pants, but since both patterns are in the process of having the sizing expanded and the size bands renamed, I sized based on my 55″ hips and did no grading.

Fabric usage: I generally squeeze my Glebe Pants from around 2 metres of 150cm wide fabric (and could use less by piecing my waistband together and using lining fabric for the pockets. There’s enough left of my original 3 metres for an extra project. I used around 2.5 metres for the Torrens Box top, and there’s still a piece left for another (small) project.

Chartreuse linen Waikerie Dress

Waikerie Dress

This is my most recent make- a Waikerie Dress (in chartreuse linen from The Fabric Store) from the Waikerie Dress expansion pack which gives you the pieces to turn the Muna and Broad Waikerie Shirt into a shirt dress!

Often it’s pretty easy to see the ‘hacking possibilities’ of a pattern, but I often get stuck actually going through with the hack because I’m worried about getting the pattern hack right, I’m not sure how much fabric I’ll need, and I’m just generally worried about making a mess of the whole thing- I hate wasting fabric.

Waikerie Dress

The Waikerie Dress Expansion was the perfect way to solve those issues and give folks the instructions and pattern pieces they need to be able to make the Waikerie Shirt in to the Waikerie Dress. What I’ve made here is a modified View C, with long-sleeves and a collar. The hem has a modern-twist on the classic shirt hem and is higher at the front than at the back- I love the way it flows down.

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Size Details: Since the pattern is an expansion, it does require some of the Waikerie Shirt pieces to complete it. The Muna and Broad sizing has recently increased (additional smaller sizes were added) and a new lettering system for the sizes. Where I was previously a Size 1, I now cut out a Size F. Right now I have a 48″ full bust and between a 52-56″ hip, depending on bloating.

Fabric Details: I pride myself on being able to jigsaw my pattern pieces pretty tight, so I managed to get this dress out of less than 3 metres of fabric (which is 148cm wide). This includes two decent size pocket pieces (could have been cut from a lining fabric), and the facing, which wraps around the neckline and down the front of the dress. I did wish that I’d picked up some of the matching linen bias binding to help with finishing the curved hem, but I didn’t think of it when I was in store.

Waikerie Dress

I had a strangely difficult time finding buttons from my stash, both because I didn’t have enough of most of them, and because the colour was a difficult one to pair. I ended up using these cute wee wooden buttons, but I didn’t have enough for my cuffs (which remain button and buttonhole-free until I can find the right buttons to pair with the dress!

I’ve already cut out and mostly sewn View B with the mitered corners and a knee-high split, and I’m also thinking about a cosy cotton version for winter (or maybe a silk noil) if I can find the perfect fabric.

Trapeze Dress from Merchant & Mills

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I tested the sizes 20 – 28 size range of the Merchant & Mills Trapeze Dress in their Woolsey Boston Fall linen/wool double gauze, which Merchant & Mills kindly sent my way along with a digital copy of the pattern for the purpose of the review.

Their extended size range goes up to a 55″ (139.5 cm) bust and 57.5″ (145.5 cm) hip. The largest finished bust measurement is 62.59″ (159 cm), there’s no given measurement for the hip measurement and the finished bicep is 18.79 ” (47.75 cm).

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